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CM : GOES TO SPACE

POCARI SWEAT

GOES TO SAPCE

The world’s first TV commercials shot in space in high definition. These commercials explore the relationship between “Earth, Man (human?), and Water” and introduce the science behind the sports drink, “POCARI SWEAT.” Two films were shot – the first, “GOES TO SPACE”, captures the launch of the Soyuz rocket TM-33 and the other, “IN SPACE”, features clips from inside the International Space Station (ISS).

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CM : IN SPACE
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CM : MAKING
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POSTER 01
POSTER 02
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MISSION BADGE

POCARI SWEAT

GOES TO SAPCE

The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA, now known as Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency - JAXA) launched a campaign, which invited the public to submit innovative ideas for the use of the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibou, an institution attached to the International Space Station (ISS). Satoshi Takamatsu submitted his proposal to “experiment shooting TV commercials in the ISS,” which was approved by NASDA as the pilot project.

The commercials explore the relationship between “Earth, Man, and Water” and introduce the science behind the sports drink, “POCARI SWEAT.” Two films were shot – one was “GOES TO SPACE”, which captured the launch of the Soyuz rocket TM-33, and the other, “IN SPACE” featured clips from inside the ISS.

To execute this project, a Soyuz rocket was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome located in Kazakhstan to carry “POCARI SWEAT” into space, and the commercials were shot using high definition cameras installed in the Russian service module, “Zvezda,” a component of the ISS.

Russian astronauts operated the camera and starred in the commercial shot inside the ISS. To enable the shoot to go smoothly, in addition to the meticulous training before the launch, we directed the shoot remotely by having real-time feedback to the crew inside the ISS from the control center at the Russian Space Agency.

This was the first time in history that a commercial was shot in space in high definition and directed remotely in real-time from the Earth.

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